Stonehenge by Brian Curtis

 By Brian Curtis UM Art Professor.
Stonehenge 2013 By Brian Curtis UM Art Professor.

Brian Curtis Stonehenge Series I&II
UM Gallery Wynwood. Miami Florida July – Sept. 2013
Miami Art Reviews.

Brian Curtis is the head of under graduate studies in Painting and drawing at University of Miami, Coral Gables. The Stonehenge Series is a departure from his life and figure paintings.
The ancient (6500yrs) megalithic stone circle of England set against a tropical sunset may seem like a remarketing tool of artistic juxtaposition but a few days after meeting the artist ,looking west from Miami Beach’s Green Diamond towards Miami’s downtown skyline. “how much alike the set sun on these new Miami megalithic towers are to Brain’s recent series”. The use of the ancient symbol “Stonehenge” has proved to be very universal this side of the Atlantic. Miami has its own mini circle, dating from a similar time in man’s history, the symbol has always been associated with the psyche,spirit and meeting place.
Brian Curtis’s Stonehenges are keys to personal spaces,each sky appealing to each destiny, the brush work delivers only as much as is required with light’s fluidity and life’s color against stone cold realism. The paintings are accompanied with mythical tales, ancient stories and ancestral traditions of ritual. It would be easy to imagine any of these paintings being a subliminal morning flash or returning welcome in many people’s homes.
Brian has succeeded in fusing two specific joys into one language, he is after all a professor of Fine Art and his use of universal symbols to evoke emotion and mind is in complete tradition of the visual language of symbols that defines Fine Art from art in general.

http://www.brian-curtis.com/um_webpage/index.html
University of Miami Wynwood Art Gallery
Wynwood Building suite # 4 – 2750 NW 3rd Ave, Miami Fl. 33127

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bY WILLIAM MARK COULTHARD AND ANA BIKIC
MIAMIARTREVIEWS@gmail.com

Saving Miami History

Saving Miami History.

Advocacy For Regional Preservation of Heritage for Economical Stability.
 by Wiliiam Coulthard / Edited by Ana Bikic Miami Art Reviews. 

Carol Cohan's book Coconut Grove
Carol Cohan’s book Coconut Grove Playhouse back cover Pickering Press 1987
Miami Art Reviews Inc.
 
 A region that relies upon tourism needs an entertainment industry. Historical sites are an integral part of this service orientated economy and the degradation and destruction of cultural interests undermines the formula a region has inherited over the decades and centuries. History is the repeated story that entertains, they are the tourist industry‘s product line and without them a region is no different than any other as a destination. 
 
  Although Miami Dade has beaches,National Parks and a pool side party image, most of our visitors are children and the retired if we include resident’s families,snow birds and annual holiday trippers. Their interests are based on more traditional pursuits that require a more intellectual approach to entertainment. Beaches and night clubs, gambling and sports are good for some but to attract an audience appreciation for the arts requires having a strong local history that is more appealing to opera lovers and art collectors, who in turn buy apartments and return each year. 
  Miami Dade County has an immediate or recent history in comparison to European regions but what interests visitors beyond just the pleasure and joy of visiting is to be entertained, educated and have memorable experiences that can be shared with friends upon returning home. Saving local history plays a vital role when tourists return home, they carry with them the stories behind the places they’ve visited. A region’s history actively stimulates  intelligent and curious minds, between natural pleasures of parks and beaches to complete the experience of an exciting and fulfilling trip to their friends. The ancient Romans understood this economic formula providing not just arena entertainment but also galleries of archival history to accompany libraries and monuments. Their tourist cities provided the very best in spas and sports but the most successful cities like Pompey and Pila had preserved and prepared more ancient sites to excite a more affluent and studied clientele.
  Miami, Miami Beach and the  Miami Dade County, as a whole, must be mindful as it expands to what foot print of the past it wipes away.  If an iconic house sitting in full view is the cover picture of an old story related to the region’s past with  internationally known cultural references; it follows that the home’s destruction would bring strong negative feed back from previous and possible visitors. If a City is seen not to care about it’s heritage then it is seen not to care about it’s visitor’s experience. So why should they return? or talk well to others?   Persuading for a location based on others opinions and published experiences, a reputation by region or location should be seen as a regional and  residential responsibility for everyone wishing to live in a successful area and enjoy  the benefits that come from an active tourist economy.  
      The history, architecture and intellectual property of local myths and stories that enrich the visitors experience of our region are vital to the tourism industry as a whole, without them Miami would be boring and predictable. Our local history adds variety to regional destination and encourages opportunities for creating new local attractions. Preservation is therefore a vital part, not an after thought, it is at the heart of our very image and if we are seen to not care what is torn down, our ineptness to protect our own interests will be ridiculed internationally.  Currently the Coconut  Grove Playhouse and the famous Star Island Mansion are up for destruction.
Now is the time to save them, like Miami did with the Daily News / Freedom Tower 12 years ago. Developers and their investors must realize history has unique and has brand name status and that the stories behind the history are an intellectual property that belongs to all the region’s residents, compromising local stories  compromises future potential. Destroying history actually limits future development.
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phone: 786-766-1714

Ponce De Leon poem by Edwin Markham 1925

     A poem for Juan Ponce De Leon 1513 -1925 

2013 Viva 500 la Florida.

         Viva Miami 500 Anniversary.

Juan Ponce De Leon 1513 Mural! Viva Florida<br />Edwin Markham Poem For Juan Ponce De Leon
Juan Ponce De Leon 1513 Mural! Viva Florida
Edwin Markham Poem For Juan Ponce De Leon.
Miami Art Reviews 2013
 25 yrs Anniversary of the New World Mural Recreation. 1988/ 2013
New World 1513 mural, Miami Freedom Tower.
 
The New World 1513 mural’s poem was composed by poet laureate Edwin Markham in 1925. 
It’s survives today to celebrate the State of Florida‘s Viva 500th Anniversary of 
Naming and Discovery by Juan Ponce De Leon in 1513 to which the mural was dedicated
and commissioned in 1925 by Gov. James Middleton Cox. whilst building the Daily News
Tower, which is now known as the National Land marked 
‘Freedom Tower’ Miami. MDC. Art Gallery and Museum.
 
The poem takes center stage of the mural design, encased in the central structure it reads.
 
  Here once by April breezes blown
You came, O gallant De Leon,
Sailed up this friendly ocean stream
To find the wells of ancient dream 
The fountain by the poets sung
Where life and love are ever young.
 
You found it not, O prince, and yet
The wells that made the heart forget
Are waiting here year ever here
With touch of some immortal sphere,
For here below these skies of gold
We have forgotten to grow old 
Here in this land where all the hours
Dance by us treading upon the flowers.
                                                                  Edwin Markham in 1925
       This simple rhyming seven versed, to Juan Ponce De Leon’s arrival on the North American continent and the poets satirical epigram to historical myths twists to include us all blessed with final days here under one glorious golden sky after another. Markham had written and recited the epigram for the Lincoln Memorial ceremony in 1922. His recital of his “Lincoln, Man of the People” had an immediate recognition which prompted  Gov.James Middleton Cox. to request Markham’s pen for a homage to the history of Miami, Florida and “these import moments in our distant histories.” (James Middleton Cox biography) 
          Edwin Markham was born in 1842, died 1940, educator, poet and American Institute of Arts and Letters member. 1922 Lincoln Memorial dedication “Lincoln, the Man of the People.” Nine schools named in his honor, A WW2 Liberty ship and Wagner College Horrmann Library archived collection of his personal library and letters. 
              Markham was a politically and socially conscious writer at odds with the modernists Pound and Elliot and their free form directions in literature. He his exampled as an American of Letters, whose work exemplifies the National tradition in Literature. His interested in working class struggles, ethnic troubles and equal opportunities in education made him a popular choice for composing important civic and cultural epigrams. 
 
               Other important works… The Man with the Hoe 1899, Lincoln and other Poems 1901, The Shoes of Happiness 1913,Children in Bondage 1914, California the Wonderful 1914, Gates of Paradise 1920, 80 poems at 80, 1932 and The Ballard of the Gallow’s Bird. published ph 1960.
 
                The M.D.C., Miami Freedom Tower’s New World 1513 mural at the M.D.C. has an epigram by Edwin Markham that dedicates to the discovery of the first known Native American settlement discovered by the Spanish new world explorer Juan Ponce De Leon who landed his boats only yards away on the shores of Biscayne Bay. The Markham poem takes center position of the 44 Ft. Long mural and in true epigram satire twists the fountain of youth fable to include our collective search and fragility, making the verse equal to all contemporary tastes some 90 years later. Perhaps Markham’s preference for the structured inclusion of cultural content and witt is after all a more constant and enduring literary style than the more subjective modernism that surrounded his later days. His Lincoln writings have been re-read and recited as we celebrate the Man’s anniversaries again. Since the Memorial’s dedication in 1922 few writers have been able to equally express our National sentiment and admiration for the iconic President Lincoln and so the poets words continue to serve.
 
Florida History 1513
Viva Florida 500.
Viva Miami 500.
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William M. Coulthard.
And  Ana Bikic.